Album artwork for Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2 by Various
Album artwork for Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2 by Various

É Soul Cultura Vol. 1 seemed to land at exactly the right moment. Post-lockdown, optimism was back on the rise and the dance floors swelled again. For many listeners, Manchester based DJ Luke Una's intriguingly woven pattern of new, old, rare and under-discovered music from around the world became the soundtrack to rejuvenated positivity. Piccadilly Records made the release their top compilation of the year, with Rough Trade placing it as their number two. The enthusiasm from the industry was mirrored by record buyers and demonstrated that in the right hands, moving through genres, tempos and decades can make perfect musical sense.

This second volume gives another opportunity for Luke to share his journey of the past four decades of staying up late and getting transcendental whilst listening to holy grail music as the city slept. It at times ventures into the deeper, spiritual, soulful, downtempo, experimental aspects of his tastes. From the conscious, street soul fusion gospel of Veronica Mickie's 'Lost Children', to an excursion into Swiss, psych, progressive rock in the form of Pyranha, then onto the classic Indian music-inspired electronic workout of Andi Otto's 'Bangalore Whispers'. Luke hints at his softer side in Avis; a sweet, obscure cover version of Minnie Riperton's 'Baby, This Love I Have', as well as championing local heroes in the shape of Manchester's Yargo and their driving, obscure, proto-house belter, 'Marimba'. There's also Japanese, electronic, slo-mo heaviness from 1979, courtesy of Bach Revolution. House music is integral to the É Soul sound and is represented by Nav Aktah's deep remix of Mr Scruff, and then there's Isis 'In Essense'; a track of such majestic brilliance that it has never left Luke's record bag.

The selection is eclectic, global, and plucked from different times and spaces. In theory, perhaps they shouldn't work together, but there is a mysterious link that makes them gel as a whole. That's what Luke does best. He creates a sort of musical alchemy, unifying the diverse.

Various

Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2

Mr Bongo
Album artwork for Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2 by Various
LPx2

£27.99

Housed in Gatefold Sleeve with OBI and Fanzine.

Black
Released 09/06/2023Catalogue Number

MRBLP268

Album artwork for Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2 by Various
CD

£14.99

Released 09/06/2023Catalogue Number

MRBCD268

Various

Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2

Mr Bongo
Album artwork for Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2 by Various
LPx2

£27.99

Housed in Gatefold Sleeve with OBI and Fanzine.

Black
Released 09/06/2023Catalogue Number

MRBLP268

Album artwork for Luke Una Presents…E Soul Cultura Vol 2 by Various
CD

£14.99

Released 09/06/2023Catalogue Number

MRBCD268

É Soul Cultura Vol. 1 seemed to land at exactly the right moment. Post-lockdown, optimism was back on the rise and the dance floors swelled again. For many listeners, Manchester based DJ Luke Una's intriguingly woven pattern of new, old, rare and under-discovered music from around the world became the soundtrack to rejuvenated positivity. Piccadilly Records made the release their top compilation of the year, with Rough Trade placing it as their number two. The enthusiasm from the industry was mirrored by record buyers and demonstrated that in the right hands, moving through genres, tempos and decades can make perfect musical sense.

This second volume gives another opportunity for Luke to share his journey of the past four decades of staying up late and getting transcendental whilst listening to holy grail music as the city slept. It at times ventures into the deeper, spiritual, soulful, downtempo, experimental aspects of his tastes. From the conscious, street soul fusion gospel of Veronica Mickie's 'Lost Children', to an excursion into Swiss, psych, progressive rock in the form of Pyranha, then onto the classic Indian music-inspired electronic workout of Andi Otto's 'Bangalore Whispers'. Luke hints at his softer side in Avis; a sweet, obscure cover version of Minnie Riperton's 'Baby, This Love I Have', as well as championing local heroes in the shape of Manchester's Yargo and their driving, obscure, proto-house belter, 'Marimba'. There's also Japanese, electronic, slo-mo heaviness from 1979, courtesy of Bach Revolution. House music is integral to the É Soul sound and is represented by Nav Aktah's deep remix of Mr Scruff, and then there's Isis 'In Essense'; a track of such majestic brilliance that it has never left Luke's record bag.

The selection is eclectic, global, and plucked from different times and spaces. In theory, perhaps they shouldn't work together, but there is a mysterious link that makes them gel as a whole. That's what Luke does best. He creates a sort of musical alchemy, unifying the diverse.