Album artwork for Screen Violence by Chvrches

Chvrches return with their fourth album Screen Violence. Recorded remotely between Glasgow and Los Angeles during the pandemic, Screen Violence derives its title from one of the band’s early proposed names before they settled on Chvrches. A decade later, the band decided to revive the name in the midst of the Covid-19 lockdown, where many relationships were tethered together over the computer amid a global crisis. The album includes "How Not to Drown," which features Robert Smith from the Cure.

Arriving three years on from their acclaimed third album Love Is Dead, Screen Violence is an ode to the digital violence experienced on screen, by screens and through screens. "I think we made the most honest and individual record we've ever done," says frontwoman Lauren Mayberry. "I feel like it's about the marriage between the stuff that's purely personal, and the stuff that's more imagery, and narrative [based]."

Chvrches

Screen Violence

Glassnote
Album artwork for Screen Violence by Chvrches
CD

$14.99

Released 08/27/2021Catalog Number

GN292.2

Chvrches

Screen Violence

Glassnote
Album artwork for Screen Violence by Chvrches
CD

$14.99

Released 08/27/2021Catalog Number

GN292.2

Chvrches return with their fourth album Screen Violence. Recorded remotely between Glasgow and Los Angeles during the pandemic, Screen Violence derives its title from one of the band’s early proposed names before they settled on Chvrches. A decade later, the band decided to revive the name in the midst of the Covid-19 lockdown, where many relationships were tethered together over the computer amid a global crisis. The album includes "How Not to Drown," which features Robert Smith from the Cure.

Arriving three years on from their acclaimed third album Love Is Dead, Screen Violence is an ode to the digital violence experienced on screen, by screens and through screens. "I think we made the most honest and individual record we've ever done," says frontwoman Lauren Mayberry. "I feel like it's about the marriage between the stuff that's purely personal, and the stuff that's more imagery, and narrative [based]."