Album artwork for Bullshit Jobs. by David Graeber

37% people in the UK believe their jobs don't make a meaningful contribution to the world

'There is something very wrong with what we have made ourselves.

We have become a civilisation based on work—not even “productive work” but work as an end and meaning in itself. We have come to believe that men and women who do not work harder than they wish at jobs they do not particularly enjoy are bad people unworthy of love, care, or assistance from their communities. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities is to rankle with resentment over the fact there might be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment, and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together.

This is a disastrous state of affairs. I wish it to end. If this book can in any way contribute to that end, it will have been worth writing.'

David Graeber

Bullshit Jobs.

B66ks
Album artwork for Album artwork for Bullshit Jobs. by David Graeber by Bullshit Jobs. - David Graeber
Album artwork for Bullshit Jobs. by David Graeber
Paperback

£5.00

Released 16/02/2022Catalogue Number

9780141998435

David Graeber

Bullshit Jobs.

B66ks
Album artwork for Album artwork for Bullshit Jobs. by David Graeber by Bullshit Jobs. - David Graeber
Album artwork for Bullshit Jobs. by David Graeber
Paperback

£5.00

Released 16/02/2022Catalogue Number

9780141998435

37% people in the UK believe their jobs don't make a meaningful contribution to the world

'There is something very wrong with what we have made ourselves.

We have become a civilisation based on work—not even “productive work” but work as an end and meaning in itself. We have come to believe that men and women who do not work harder than they wish at jobs they do not particularly enjoy are bad people unworthy of love, care, or assistance from their communities. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities is to rankle with resentment over the fact there might be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment, and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together.

This is a disastrous state of affairs. I wish it to end. If this book can in any way contribute to that end, it will have been worth writing.'