Pre-Orders & New

Exclusives & Limited

Best of 2022

Books

Sale

Merch / Stereo

The Gift Shop

Genres

Events

Blog

Club


Account

United Kingdom

Album artwork for Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That by Dylan Jones

Part oral history, part narrative pop culture, part celebration of the music of 1995

Decades tend to crest halfway through, and 1995 was the year of the Nineties: peak
Britpop (Oasis v Blur), peak YBA (Tracey Emin's tent), peak New Lad (when Nick Hornby
published High Fidelity, when James Brown's Loaded detonated the publishing industry,
and when pubs were finally allowed to stay open on a Sunday). It was the year of The
Bends, the year Danny Boyle started filming Trainspotting, the year Richey Edwards went
missing, the year Alex Garland wrote The Beach, the year Blair changed Clause IV after a
controversial vote at the Labour Conference.

Not only was the mid-Nineties perhaps the last time that rock stars, music journalists and
pop consumers held onto a belief in rock's mystical power, it was a period of huge cultural
upheaval - in art, literature, publishing and drugs. And it was a period of almost
unparalleled hedonism, a time when many people thought they deserved to live the rock
and roll lifestyle, when a generation of narcotic omnivores thought they could all be rock
stars just by buying a magazine and a copy of (What's the Story) Morning Glory?

Faster Than a Cannonball is a cultural swipe of the decade from loungecore to the rise of
New Labour, teasing all the relevant artistic strands through interviews with all the major
protagonists and exhaustive re-evaluations of the important records of the year - The
Bends by Radiohead, Grand Prix by Teenage Fanclub, Maxinquaye by Tricky, Different
Class by Pulp, The Great Escape by Blur, It's Great When You're Straight... Yeah! by Black
Grape, Exit Planet Dust by the Chemical Brothers, I Should Coco by Supergrass, Elastica
by Elastica, Pure Phase by Spiritualized, ...I Care Because You Do by Aphex Twin and of
course (What's the Story) Morning Glory by Oasis, the most iconic album of the decade.

Dylan Jones

Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That

White Rabbit
Album artwork for Album artwork for Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That by Dylan Jones by Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That - Dylan Jones
Album artwork for Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That by Dylan Jones
Hardback

£25.00

Released 13/10/2022Catalogue Number

9781474624572

Dylan Jones

Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That

White Rabbit
Album artwork for Album artwork for Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That by Dylan Jones by Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That - Dylan Jones
Album artwork for Faster Than A Cannonball 1995 And All That by Dylan Jones
Hardback

£25.00

Released 13/10/2022Catalogue Number

9781474624572

Part oral history, part narrative pop culture, part celebration of the music of 1995

Decades tend to crest halfway through, and 1995 was the year of the Nineties: peak
Britpop (Oasis v Blur), peak YBA (Tracey Emin's tent), peak New Lad (when Nick Hornby
published High Fidelity, when James Brown's Loaded detonated the publishing industry,
and when pubs were finally allowed to stay open on a Sunday). It was the year of The
Bends, the year Danny Boyle started filming Trainspotting, the year Richey Edwards went
missing, the year Alex Garland wrote The Beach, the year Blair changed Clause IV after a
controversial vote at the Labour Conference.

Not only was the mid-Nineties perhaps the last time that rock stars, music journalists and
pop consumers held onto a belief in rock's mystical power, it was a period of huge cultural
upheaval - in art, literature, publishing and drugs. And it was a period of almost
unparalleled hedonism, a time when many people thought they deserved to live the rock
and roll lifestyle, when a generation of narcotic omnivores thought they could all be rock
stars just by buying a magazine and a copy of (What's the Story) Morning Glory?

Faster Than a Cannonball is a cultural swipe of the decade from loungecore to the rise of
New Labour, teasing all the relevant artistic strands through interviews with all the major
protagonists and exhaustive re-evaluations of the important records of the year - The
Bends by Radiohead, Grand Prix by Teenage Fanclub, Maxinquaye by Tricky, Different
Class by Pulp, The Great Escape by Blur, It's Great When You're Straight... Yeah! by Black
Grape, Exit Planet Dust by the Chemical Brothers, I Should Coco by Supergrass, Elastica
by Elastica, Pure Phase by Spiritualized, ...I Care Because You Do by Aphex Twin and of
course (What's the Story) Morning Glory by Oasis, the most iconic album of the decade.