Album artwork for Stillcide by Helms Alee

Every music nerd has gotten roped into the desert island conversation. You know—what's the one record you would bring with you to some remote location to provide solace for the rest of your days? Or better yet, what's the one band whose catalog would always remain fresh to your ears, even after years and years of isolation? Of course, the ideal candidate would be a band who has a significant body of work, a band who's songs span a variety of temperaments and timbres, and, obviously, a band that just plain rules. With their fourth album, Stillicide, Helms Alee prove that they might be the only group you would need for the rest of your life. Hyperbole? Perhaps. But the Washington state trio of Ben Verellen (guitar, vocals), Dana James (bass, vocals), and Hozoji Margullis (drums, vocals) delivers the kind of expertly crafted, dynamic, nuanced, and diverse songwriting that is both instantly engaging and—as evidenced by their previous albums Night Terror (2008), Weatherhead (2011), and Sleepwalking Sailors (2014)—increasingly gratifying after years of repeated listens. With Stillicide, Helms Alee continues their sonic tradition of blending heavy riffs, dark guitar pop, and math rock into songs that are at turns brutal, anthemic, and cerebrally engaging. The band set a high bar for themselves with their spectacular debut album Night Terror, but every subsequent release has trumped their previous endeavors. Bolstered by the recording and production expertise of Kurt Ballou at God City Studios, Stillicide is not only the group's strongest collection of songs, it is arguably their best sounding release to date. The heavier moments are that much more oppressive; their melodic angles are that much more beguiling, and the juxtaposition between Verellen's patriarchal roar and the siren song vocals of James and Margullis is that much more exhilarating. If there was only one band you could listen to for the rest of your life, Helms Alee would satiate most every emotional yearning. And if you could only pick one of their albums, you'd gravitate towards the best document of their textural range and songwriting chops. You'd gravitate towards Stillicide.

Helms Alee

Stillcide

Sargent House
Album artwork for Stillcide by Helms Alee
CD

£12.99

Released 31/08/2016Catalogue Number

sh164cd

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Stillcide by Helms Alee
LP

£21.99

Released 02/09/2016Catalogue Number

sh165lp

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Helms Alee

Stillcide

Sargent House
Album artwork for Stillcide by Helms Alee
CD

£12.99

Released 31/08/2016Catalogue Number

sh164cd

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Stillcide by Helms Alee
LP

£21.99

Released 02/09/2016Catalogue Number

sh165lp

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Every music nerd has gotten roped into the desert island conversation. You know—what's the one record you would bring with you to some remote location to provide solace for the rest of your days? Or better yet, what's the one band whose catalog would always remain fresh to your ears, even after years and years of isolation? Of course, the ideal candidate would be a band who has a significant body of work, a band who's songs span a variety of temperaments and timbres, and, obviously, a band that just plain rules. With their fourth album, Stillicide, Helms Alee prove that they might be the only group you would need for the rest of your life. Hyperbole? Perhaps. But the Washington state trio of Ben Verellen (guitar, vocals), Dana James (bass, vocals), and Hozoji Margullis (drums, vocals) delivers the kind of expertly crafted, dynamic, nuanced, and diverse songwriting that is both instantly engaging and—as evidenced by their previous albums Night Terror (2008), Weatherhead (2011), and Sleepwalking Sailors (2014)—increasingly gratifying after years of repeated listens. With Stillicide, Helms Alee continues their sonic tradition of blending heavy riffs, dark guitar pop, and math rock into songs that are at turns brutal, anthemic, and cerebrally engaging. The band set a high bar for themselves with their spectacular debut album Night Terror, but every subsequent release has trumped their previous endeavors. Bolstered by the recording and production expertise of Kurt Ballou at God City Studios, Stillicide is not only the group's strongest collection of songs, it is arguably their best sounding release to date. The heavier moments are that much more oppressive; their melodic angles are that much more beguiling, and the juxtaposition between Verellen's patriarchal roar and the siren song vocals of James and Margullis is that much more exhilarating. If there was only one band you could listen to for the rest of your life, Helms Alee would satiate most every emotional yearning. And if you could only pick one of their albums, you'd gravitate towards the best document of their textural range and songwriting chops. You'd gravitate towards Stillicide.