Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman

Bonny Light Horseman’s self-titled debut was a folk masterclass, reimagining centuries-old standards with effortless grace and wonder. Those Grammy-nominated, list-topping recordings not only suggested renewed possibilities for aging songbooks but also marked the arrival of a trio fully capable of reorienting the wider folk landscape. Still, if it felt at all like the work of some short-lived supergroup or a one-off diversion (it never was), Rolling Golden Holy rebuffs the notion with preternatural beauty and charm, and imagination.These songs, all originals, follow the paths of the traditional tunes the band cherishes to new frontiers, the sounds and situations of history given the gravity and shape of now. This is a band working at the edge of modern folk.

After the release of their debut, Anaïs Mitchell, Josh Kaufman, and Eric D. Johnson began discussing their next steps, loosely planning on writing and recording stints. Those sessions were delayed for all the unpredictable but now-familiar reasons until the Spring of 2021, when the trio reconvened with their families in tow in upstate New York. Their chemistry remained intact. Johnson’s wife Annie had listened to him work with dozens of collaborators over the decades, but, listening in from one room over, she noted he’d never seemed so at ease and productive as he was with Kaufman and Mitchell in Woodstock. They were perfecting “California,” a timely and incorruptible classic about moving on in search of something else, something more. These sessions were a series of “yes, and” encounters, each one encouraging the others to take an idea and run with it further to the new safety net they’ve built together, for one another.

These songs continually suggest and embody an unspoken continuum between traditional and modern folk. Mitchell finds self-sustaining adoration in steamy backseats, nighttime visions, and seasonal storms during “Summer Dream,” crisscrossing generational symbols to tie past, present, and future into a Gordian knot of devotion. Johnson reaches back to 19th-century wartime on “Someone to Weep for Me” to empathize with someone else descended from “a long line of nobodies,” just trying to live long enough to feel like he’s mattered to anyone at all, a notion that knows neither age nor border. Johnson and Mitchell trade lines on “Exile,” their luminous response to another of humanity’s eternal conundrums—how to revel in relationships that we know will one day leave us lonely. Love and loss, death and fear: the songs may be different, but the emotional sources remain.

Bonny Light Horseman

Rolling Golden Holy

37d03d
Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP+

$23.99

With Signed Print, Limited to 100 Copies in US

Fool's Gold Vinyl

Rough Trade Exclusive
Signed Copy
Limited to 500 copies
Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp-C2postcard

Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP+

$23.99

Fool's Gold Vinyl

Rough Trade Exclusive
Limited to 500 copies
Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp-C2

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP+

$23.99

Indie Exclusive

Blue Galaxy Vinyl

Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp-C1

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman by Rolling Golden Holy - Bonny Light Horseman
Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
CD

$12.99

Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031cd

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP

$22.99

Black
Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp

Bonny Light Horseman

Rolling Golden Holy

37d03d
Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP+

$23.99

With Signed Print, Limited to 100 Copies in US

Fool's Gold Vinyl

Rough Trade Exclusive
Signed Copy
Limited to 500 copies
Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp-C2postcard

Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP+

$23.99

Fool's Gold Vinyl

Rough Trade Exclusive
Limited to 500 copies
Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp-C2

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP+

$23.99

Indie Exclusive

Blue Galaxy Vinyl

Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp-C1

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman by Rolling Golden Holy - Bonny Light Horseman
Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
CD

$12.99

Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031cd

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Album artwork for Rolling Golden Holy by Bonny Light Horseman
LP

$22.99

Black
Released 10/07/2022Catalogue Number

37d031lp

Bonny Light Horseman’s self-titled debut was a folk masterclass, reimagining centuries-old standards with effortless grace and wonder. Those Grammy-nominated, list-topping recordings not only suggested renewed possibilities for aging songbooks but also marked the arrival of a trio fully capable of reorienting the wider folk landscape. Still, if it felt at all like the work of some short-lived supergroup or a one-off diversion (it never was), Rolling Golden Holy rebuffs the notion with preternatural beauty and charm, and imagination.These songs, all originals, follow the paths of the traditional tunes the band cherishes to new frontiers, the sounds and situations of history given the gravity and shape of now. This is a band working at the edge of modern folk.

After the release of their debut, Anaïs Mitchell, Josh Kaufman, and Eric D. Johnson began discussing their next steps, loosely planning on writing and recording stints. Those sessions were delayed for all the unpredictable but now-familiar reasons until the Spring of 2021, when the trio reconvened with their families in tow in upstate New York. Their chemistry remained intact. Johnson’s wife Annie had listened to him work with dozens of collaborators over the decades, but, listening in from one room over, she noted he’d never seemed so at ease and productive as he was with Kaufman and Mitchell in Woodstock. They were perfecting “California,” a timely and incorruptible classic about moving on in search of something else, something more. These sessions were a series of “yes, and” encounters, each one encouraging the others to take an idea and run with it further to the new safety net they’ve built together, for one another.

These songs continually suggest and embody an unspoken continuum between traditional and modern folk. Mitchell finds self-sustaining adoration in steamy backseats, nighttime visions, and seasonal storms during “Summer Dream,” crisscrossing generational symbols to tie past, present, and future into a Gordian knot of devotion. Johnson reaches back to 19th-century wartime on “Someone to Weep for Me” to empathize with someone else descended from “a long line of nobodies,” just trying to live long enough to feel like he’s mattered to anyone at all, a notion that knows neither age nor border. Johnson and Mitchell trade lines on “Exile,” their luminous response to another of humanity’s eternal conundrums—how to revel in relationships that we know will one day leave us lonely. Love and loss, death and fear: the songs may be different, but the emotional sources remain.