Album artwork for Death Peak by Clark

Clark toys with the “most perfect synth” aka the human voice on his eighth and latest album for Warp.

Death Peak! Surely the recommended way to pronounce Clark’s latest album is with your very best Don LaFontaine voice. The Warp massive will be all over ‘Death Peak’ which further finesses Clark’s canny LP formulae of splicing multiple sonic DNA sources into his main molecular structure, ensuring the end result doesn’t lose its inherent Clarkness. The main difference to previous Clark albums is the introduction of vocals – thankfully not Karl Hyde’s, that’s right Warp and Eno we haven’t forgot – but rather implemented as an instrumental element by the producer.

Commencing with the spry, malevolent drama of opening interlude Spring But Dark, Clark leads all on a merry dance through nine tracks that touch on early Hessle wrong footers, post-trance digressions of Evian Christ or Lorenzo Senni, and the intricate sound design of Laurel Halo.

After spending the duration of the album exploring these ideas in isolation, Clark elects to cram several into the nine-minute closing suite Un U.K.

Clark

Death Peak

Warp
Album artwork for Album artwork for Death Peak by Clark by Death Peak - Clark
Album artwork for Death Peak by Clark
LP

$30.99

LP

Released 04/07/2017Catalogue Number

LP-WRP-282

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Clark

Death Peak

Warp
Album artwork for Album artwork for Death Peak by Clark by Death Peak - Clark
Album artwork for Death Peak by Clark
LP

$30.99

LP

Released 04/07/2017Catalogue Number

LP-WRP-282

Usually dispatched in 5-10 days

Clark toys with the “most perfect synth” aka the human voice on his eighth and latest album for Warp.

Death Peak! Surely the recommended way to pronounce Clark’s latest album is with your very best Don LaFontaine voice. The Warp massive will be all over ‘Death Peak’ which further finesses Clark’s canny LP formulae of splicing multiple sonic DNA sources into his main molecular structure, ensuring the end result doesn’t lose its inherent Clarkness. The main difference to previous Clark albums is the introduction of vocals – thankfully not Karl Hyde’s, that’s right Warp and Eno we haven’t forgot – but rather implemented as an instrumental element by the producer.

Commencing with the spry, malevolent drama of opening interlude Spring But Dark, Clark leads all on a merry dance through nine tracks that touch on early Hessle wrong footers, post-trance digressions of Evian Christ or Lorenzo Senni, and the intricate sound design of Laurel Halo.

After spending the duration of the album exploring these ideas in isolation, Clark elects to cram several into the nine-minute closing suite Un U.K.