Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights

David Kilgour’s 11th solo album, Bobbie’s A Girl is a quieter affair than fans may associate with the pioneer ofNew Zealand indie rock. The style set in at the beginning of sessions, as he and the Heavy Eights (i.e., longtime collaborators Thomas Bell, Tony de Raad, and Taane Tokona) headed to Port Chalmers Recording Services with producer Tex Houston. Largely missing the jangly distortion of Kilgour’s other work, the album’s ten songs exude a hazy warmth, with a light psychedelia that recalls the ’60s outfits like The Byrds and The Velvet Underground.

David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights

Bobbie's A Girl

Merge Records
Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights
CD

£12.99

Released 20/09/2019Catalogue Number

MRG688CD

Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights
LP +

£22.99

Clear/Yellow and Red Swirl.

Includes download code
Released 20/09/2019Catalogue Number

MRG688LPC1

Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights
LP

£22.99

Black
Includes download code
Released 20/09/2019Catalogue Number

MRG688LP

David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights

Bobbie's A Girl

Merge Records
Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights
CD

£12.99

Released 20/09/2019Catalogue Number

MRG688CD

Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights
LP +

£22.99

Clear/Yellow and Red Swirl.

Includes download code
Released 20/09/2019Catalogue Number

MRG688LPC1

Album artwork for Bobbie's A Girl by David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights
LP

£22.99

Black
Includes download code
Released 20/09/2019Catalogue Number

MRG688LP

David Kilgour’s 11th solo album, Bobbie’s A Girl is a quieter affair than fans may associate with the pioneer ofNew Zealand indie rock. The style set in at the beginning of sessions, as he and the Heavy Eights (i.e., longtime collaborators Thomas Bell, Tony de Raad, and Taane Tokona) headed to Port Chalmers Recording Services with producer Tex Houston. Largely missing the jangly distortion of Kilgour’s other work, the album’s ten songs exude a hazy warmth, with a light psychedelia that recalls the ’60s outfits like The Byrds and The Velvet Underground.