Album artwork for Dizzy by Dizzy

Katie Munshaw really needed to finish the fucking quilt, and find a way to sew herself into it. The lead singer of Ontario four-piece Dizzy has been thinking a lot about the way things look and the way you can find comfort in disappearing into it all. She describes the album, a bright indie-pop beast continuing the legacy built from two previous shimmering records, as a "patchwork quilt" with each song a square, or a sliver, of her life. "None of them have all that much to do with each other and yet they wouldn't exist without one another," she says. It makes for a colourful record that's intrinsically Dizzy - one that swerves comparison, instead reflecting the shapeshifting and imperfect nature of its musicians. Avoiding the spotlight yet more confidently themselves than ever. Munshaw is satisfied with where this record finds Dizzy.

The band's first record, she says, was "formative" to what kind of musician she became, even though "I was young and had no business making a record. The Sun and Her Scorch was our rebellious teenage phase where we thought we could do it all ourselves, this new chapter is about throwing our hands up saying 'we don't have all the answers. I'm open to having somebody help me. Help us.'" Listeners will find that Dizzy have made what sounds like their most confident work to date; embracing the best parts of what has made fans fall in love with them in the past while confidently stepping into the future and trying new things; ready to show the world exactly who they are as artists - mask or no mask.

Dizzy

Dizzy

Communion
Album artwork for Dizzy by Dizzy
LP

£24.99

Forest Green

Released 18/08/2023Catalogue Number

COMM541

Album artwork for Dizzy by Dizzy
CD

£10.99

Released 18/08/2023Catalogue Number

COMM542

Dizzy

Dizzy

Communion
Album artwork for Dizzy by Dizzy
LP

£24.99

Forest Green

Released 18/08/2023Catalogue Number

COMM541

Album artwork for Dizzy by Dizzy
CD

£10.99

Released 18/08/2023Catalogue Number

COMM542

Katie Munshaw really needed to finish the fucking quilt, and find a way to sew herself into it. The lead singer of Ontario four-piece Dizzy has been thinking a lot about the way things look and the way you can find comfort in disappearing into it all. She describes the album, a bright indie-pop beast continuing the legacy built from two previous shimmering records, as a "patchwork quilt" with each song a square, or a sliver, of her life. "None of them have all that much to do with each other and yet they wouldn't exist without one another," she says. It makes for a colourful record that's intrinsically Dizzy - one that swerves comparison, instead reflecting the shapeshifting and imperfect nature of its musicians. Avoiding the spotlight yet more confidently themselves than ever. Munshaw is satisfied with where this record finds Dizzy.

The band's first record, she says, was "formative" to what kind of musician she became, even though "I was young and had no business making a record. The Sun and Her Scorch was our rebellious teenage phase where we thought we could do it all ourselves, this new chapter is about throwing our hands up saying 'we don't have all the answers. I'm open to having somebody help me. Help us.'" Listeners will find that Dizzy have made what sounds like their most confident work to date; embracing the best parts of what has made fans fall in love with them in the past while confidently stepping into the future and trying new things; ready to show the world exactly who they are as artists - mask or no mask.