Album artwork for So What? It's a Broadcast from 1971 by Miles Davis

Having stalked the New York City bandstands during the bebop era, ushered in the "cool school" movement and spearheaded jazz music's turn to modal sounds, Miles Davis had already been at the forefront of the jazz scene for over two decades by the time he embarked on a controversial voyage of discovery in the late 60s. Embracing electronic instruments and incorporating more pronounced African rhythms into his music, the "Dark Magus" connected with a rock audience looking to expand its collective mind, even as he left jazz purists baffled by his increasingly outlandish live performances. With a band featuring such pathfinding icons as Keith Jarrett (keyboards), Gary Bartz (saxophone) and Michael Henderson (bass), along with a powerhouse rhythm trio of drummer Leon Chancler and percussionists Don Alias and James "Mtume" Forman, Davis' set at Chateau Neuf, Oslo, on 9 November 1971, included radically reimagined highlights from his Bitches Brew and Jack Johnson albums, along with further shape-shifting examples of the jazz icon's fearless genius.

Miles Davis

So What? It's a Broadcast from 1971

Nova Tunes
Album artwork for So What? It's a Broadcast from 1971 by Miles Davis
CD

£10.99

Released 07/07/2023Catalogue Number

FMGZ161CD

Miles Davis

So What? It's a Broadcast from 1971

Nova Tunes
Album artwork for So What? It's a Broadcast from 1971 by Miles Davis
CD

£10.99

Released 07/07/2023Catalogue Number

FMGZ161CD

Having stalked the New York City bandstands during the bebop era, ushered in the "cool school" movement and spearheaded jazz music's turn to modal sounds, Miles Davis had already been at the forefront of the jazz scene for over two decades by the time he embarked on a controversial voyage of discovery in the late 60s. Embracing electronic instruments and incorporating more pronounced African rhythms into his music, the "Dark Magus" connected with a rock audience looking to expand its collective mind, even as he left jazz purists baffled by his increasingly outlandish live performances. With a band featuring such pathfinding icons as Keith Jarrett (keyboards), Gary Bartz (saxophone) and Michael Henderson (bass), along with a powerhouse rhythm trio of drummer Leon Chancler and percussionists Don Alias and James "Mtume" Forman, Davis' set at Chateau Neuf, Oslo, on 9 November 1971, included radically reimagined highlights from his Bitches Brew and Jack Johnson albums, along with further shape-shifting examples of the jazz icon's fearless genius.