Album artwork for Last Time I Saw Him by Diana Ross

The early 1970s were a pivotal time for Diana Ross.

Last Time I Saw Him is particularly striking as the spotlight belongs on Ross' remarkable versatility. The title composition is larger-than-life with Michael Omartian and Gene Page's arrangement. They throw in everything but the proverbial kitchen sink with a score that is all over the musical map from Dixieland band jazz to banjo-pickin' and even an orchestrated string section. The ballads "Love Me" and "Sleepin'" are among the best that Ross has to offer. The latter is marked by a dramatic delivery, suggesting a subtext that would reveal more than the story lets on at face value. She likewise scores on the light and funky love song "When Will I Come Home to You" thanks to a jazzy melody and catchy chorus. "You" is another winner as the gospel-infused redemptive waltz is custom-made for Ross' emotive reading. Ross returns to form for the upbeat rocker "I Heard a Love Song (But You Never Made a Sound)" with roots reaching deep into a vintage Motown groove. "Stone Liberty" continues with an empowering R&B statement that might have been penned for the emergent women's liberation movement, but works equally as well as a personal declaration of freedom for all oppressed peoples.

Diana Ross

Last Time I Saw Him

LMLR
Album artwork for Last Time I Saw Him by Diana Ross
CD

$15.99

Released 10/10/2017Catalog Number

LLM782706.2

Diana Ross

Last Time I Saw Him

LMLR
Album artwork for Last Time I Saw Him by Diana Ross
CD

$15.99

Released 10/10/2017Catalog Number

LLM782706.2

The early 1970s were a pivotal time for Diana Ross.

Last Time I Saw Him is particularly striking as the spotlight belongs on Ross' remarkable versatility. The title composition is larger-than-life with Michael Omartian and Gene Page's arrangement. They throw in everything but the proverbial kitchen sink with a score that is all over the musical map from Dixieland band jazz to banjo-pickin' and even an orchestrated string section. The ballads "Love Me" and "Sleepin'" are among the best that Ross has to offer. The latter is marked by a dramatic delivery, suggesting a subtext that would reveal more than the story lets on at face value. She likewise scores on the light and funky love song "When Will I Come Home to You" thanks to a jazzy melody and catchy chorus. "You" is another winner as the gospel-infused redemptive waltz is custom-made for Ross' emotive reading. Ross returns to form for the upbeat rocker "I Heard a Love Song (But You Never Made a Sound)" with roots reaching deep into a vintage Motown groove. "Stone Liberty" continues with an empowering R&B statement that might have been penned for the emergent women's liberation movement, but works equally as well as a personal declaration of freedom for all oppressed peoples.