Album artwork for Shout Sister Shout by Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Shout Sister Shout is a brand new collection including previously unreleased group and solo recordings by Sister Rosetta Tharpe from 1957 to 1971.

Not only did Sister Rosetta audaciously lead black gospel out of the church and into nightclubs and concert venues during the late 1930s – thus broadening its demographics exponentially if risking the wrath of the pious – she saw no conflict in singing holy material for the duly converted and an occasional earthy blues for the rhythm and blues market. Whether she was belting out a joyous invitation to hop aboard the Gospel Train or announcing her yen for a tall skinny papa, Tharpe emoted from the very depths of her soul, deftly accompanying her booming, melismatic pipes with a blistering, single-string-permeated guitar technique that rivaled that of blueswoman Memphis Minnie (or any axe-toting male on the scene, for that matter). Displaying a dazzling stage presence that radiated star quality, the Sister was wowing crowds across the nation well prior to Mahalia Jackson’s ascendancy to the throne as gospel’s queen.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Shout Sister Shout

Sunset Blvd Records
Album artwork for Shout Sister Shout by Sister Rosetta Tharpe
LP

$26.99

150g Vinyl

Black
Released 01/19/2024Catalog Number

LP-SBR-7043

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Shout Sister Shout

Sunset Blvd Records
Album artwork for Shout Sister Shout by Sister Rosetta Tharpe
LP

$26.99

150g Vinyl

Black
Released 01/19/2024Catalog Number

LP-SBR-7043

Shout Sister Shout is a brand new collection including previously unreleased group and solo recordings by Sister Rosetta Tharpe from 1957 to 1971.

Not only did Sister Rosetta audaciously lead black gospel out of the church and into nightclubs and concert venues during the late 1930s – thus broadening its demographics exponentially if risking the wrath of the pious – she saw no conflict in singing holy material for the duly converted and an occasional earthy blues for the rhythm and blues market. Whether she was belting out a joyous invitation to hop aboard the Gospel Train or announcing her yen for a tall skinny papa, Tharpe emoted from the very depths of her soul, deftly accompanying her booming, melismatic pipes with a blistering, single-string-permeated guitar technique that rivaled that of blueswoman Memphis Minnie (or any axe-toting male on the scene, for that matter). Displaying a dazzling stage presence that radiated star quality, the Sister was wowing crowds across the nation well prior to Mahalia Jackson’s ascendancy to the throne as gospel’s queen.