Album artwork for The Daisy Age - Bob Stanley by Various

Compilation of the year. It wasn’t really a movement, barely even a moment, but the Daisy Age was an ethos that permeated pop, R&B and hip hop at the turn of the 90s. Playfulness and good humour were central to De La Soul’s 1989 debut album, 3 Feet High And Rising, which would go on to cast a long, multi-coloured shadow over rap.

In Britain, the timing for 3 Feet High And Rising couldn’t have been better. The acid house explosion of 1988 would lead to a radical breaking down of musical barriers in 1989, and its associated look – loose clothing, dayglo colours, smiley faces – chimed with the positivity of De La Soul and rising New York rap acts the Jungle Brothers and A Tribe Called Quest, all at the heart of a growing collective called Native Tongues.

The Native Tongues’ charismatic, summery aura quickly spread west to the Bay Area’s similarly-minded Hieroglyphics crew (Del Tha Funky Homosapien’s Mistadobalina); Canada’s Dream Warriors (My Definition Of A Boombastic Jazz Style) used 3 Feet High’s colour palette and borrowed Count Basie and Quincy Jones riffs; Naughty By Nature (OPP) were mentored by Native Tongues heroine Queen Latifah, while Londoner Monie Love was also adopted by the collective, resulting in her Grammy-nominated It’s A Shame (My Sister).

It wasn’t built to last, but the Daisy Age reintroduced Multiplication Rock, bubble writing and the gently psychedelic into the charts. It was a brief, but extraordinarily warm and optimistic moment. The songs on this collection promised that the 90s would be a lot more easy-going than the 80s.

Tracklisting:
1. A Roller Skating Jam Named Saturdays - De La Soul Featuring Q-Tip & Vinia Mojica
2. Bonita Applebum - A Tribe Called Quest
3. Sunshine Men - The Freestyle Fellowship
4. Mistadobalina - Del Tha Funkeé Homosapien
5. What's Up Doc? (Can We Rock?) (K-Cut's Fat Trac Remix) - Fu-Schnickens With Shaquille O'Neal
6. Doowutchyalike - Digital Underground
7. Peachfuzz - KMD
8. Doin' Our Own Dang - Jungle Brothers
9. Mama Gave Birth To The Soul Children - Queen Latifah Featuring De La Soul
10. O.P.P. - Naughty By Nature
11. Where I'm From - Digable Planets
12. It's A Shame (My Sister) - Monie Love Featuring True Image
13. K Sera Sera - Justin Warfield
14. All For One - Brand Nubian
15. Case Of The P.T.A. - Leaders Of The New School
16. My Definition Of A Boombastic Jazz Style - Dream Warriors
17. The Choice Is Yours - Black Sheep
18. Age Ain't Nothin' But A # - Chi-Ali
19. We Run Things (It's Like Dat) - Da Bush Babees
20. You're Not Coming Home (Mase's Funkay Recall Mix) - Groove Garden

Various

The Daisy Age - Bob Stanley

Ace Records
Album artwork for The Daisy Age - Bob Stanley by Various
LPx2

$35.99

Released 11/05/2021Catalog Number

ACI7010016.1

Various

The Daisy Age - Bob Stanley

Ace Records
Album artwork for The Daisy Age - Bob Stanley by Various
LPx2

$35.99

Released 11/05/2021Catalog Number

ACI7010016.1

Compilation of the year. It wasn’t really a movement, barely even a moment, but the Daisy Age was an ethos that permeated pop, R&B and hip hop at the turn of the 90s. Playfulness and good humour were central to De La Soul’s 1989 debut album, 3 Feet High And Rising, which would go on to cast a long, multi-coloured shadow over rap.

In Britain, the timing for 3 Feet High And Rising couldn’t have been better. The acid house explosion of 1988 would lead to a radical breaking down of musical barriers in 1989, and its associated look – loose clothing, dayglo colours, smiley faces – chimed with the positivity of De La Soul and rising New York rap acts the Jungle Brothers and A Tribe Called Quest, all at the heart of a growing collective called Native Tongues.

The Native Tongues’ charismatic, summery aura quickly spread west to the Bay Area’s similarly-minded Hieroglyphics crew (Del Tha Funky Homosapien’s Mistadobalina); Canada’s Dream Warriors (My Definition Of A Boombastic Jazz Style) used 3 Feet High’s colour palette and borrowed Count Basie and Quincy Jones riffs; Naughty By Nature (OPP) were mentored by Native Tongues heroine Queen Latifah, while Londoner Monie Love was also adopted by the collective, resulting in her Grammy-nominated It’s A Shame (My Sister).

It wasn’t built to last, but the Daisy Age reintroduced Multiplication Rock, bubble writing and the gently psychedelic into the charts. It was a brief, but extraordinarily warm and optimistic moment. The songs on this collection promised that the 90s would be a lot more easy-going than the 80s.

Tracklisting:
1. A Roller Skating Jam Named Saturdays - De La Soul Featuring Q-Tip & Vinia Mojica
2. Bonita Applebum - A Tribe Called Quest
3. Sunshine Men - The Freestyle Fellowship
4. Mistadobalina - Del Tha Funkeé Homosapien
5. What's Up Doc? (Can We Rock?) (K-Cut's Fat Trac Remix) - Fu-Schnickens With Shaquille O'Neal
6. Doowutchyalike - Digital Underground
7. Peachfuzz - KMD
8. Doin' Our Own Dang - Jungle Brothers
9. Mama Gave Birth To The Soul Children - Queen Latifah Featuring De La Soul
10. O.P.P. - Naughty By Nature
11. Where I'm From - Digable Planets
12. It's A Shame (My Sister) - Monie Love Featuring True Image
13. K Sera Sera - Justin Warfield
14. All For One - Brand Nubian
15. Case Of The P.T.A. - Leaders Of The New School
16. My Definition Of A Boombastic Jazz Style - Dream Warriors
17. The Choice Is Yours - Black Sheep
18. Age Ain't Nothin' But A # - Chi-Ali
19. We Run Things (It's Like Dat) - Da Bush Babees
20. You're Not Coming Home (Mase's Funkay Recall Mix) - Groove Garden